Tyler Harris

Tyler Harris

Finance, 2018

Hometown: Palatine, IL

Internships:

  • 2015: ISSLP - Endeavor - South Africa, Johannesburg
  • 2016: Glynn Capital - Menlo Park, CA

Tyler seeks strenuous experiences that combine his passions for finance and social entrepreneurship to cultivate an integrated vision for the future that takes a sustainable, human-centered approach to problem-solving.  He recognizes the necessity for unwavering open-mindedness in the face of complex or uncomfortable questions and problems.  Studying both finance and theology at Notre Dame, Tyler strives to advance his understanding of investment strategies while deepening his awareness of and conviction for Catholic social teachings.

Invigorated by the power of social innovation to transform communities
"I wholeheartedly believe that financial success follows when one takes an integral and holistic approach to the human experience while tackling a human need that truly matters.  During the summer of 2015, my experiences with a global entrepreneurial accelerator in South Africa revealed the power of timely, simple innovations to disrupt and transform communities in a positive way.  Engaging the accelerator's network of entrepreneurs and business mentors refined his understanding of businesses that truly matter and enhanced my passion for venture capital and social entrepreneurship."

Take an integrated perspective on the world
"While in South Africa, for the first time in my life, I was forced to grapple with very personal and disconcerting topics in an open and honest way.  And through it, although a painful struggle at times, I learned that uncomfortableness is necessary: we need to be comfortable with discomfort if we are to effectively address injustice.  As the future business and policy leaders of tomorrow, we must cherish our time at Notre Dame as a rare opportunity to constantly challenge ourselves to think and see things differently.  We are called to embrace with conviction the multifaceted and frustrating socioeconomic challenges that others would rather avoid."